For HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONAL (HCP)

The following table provides information for all routinely recommended vaccines for adults.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Information for vaccines routinely recommended for adults:
Vaccine Indications
Chickenpox

The chickenpox (varicella) vaccine helps prevent chicken pox. People born in the United States before 1980 are considered to be immune to chickenpox.

Who should get the chickenpox vaccine (if no evidence of immunity):
  • People born in the United States in 1980 or later
  • People who have close contact with other people who are at high risk for chickenpox (such as health care workers and those who live with people who have a weakened immune system)
  • People in settings where chickenpox can spread easily (such as teachers, childcare workers, and college students)
  • International travelers

Who should not get the chickenpox vaccine:
  • Pregnant women
  • People with a weakened immune system
  • People with HIV infection and a CD4 count under 200

Go to https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/varicella.pdf for information about chickenpox and chickenpox (varicella) vaccine.
Hepatitis A

Hepatitis A vaccine helps prevent hepatitis A virus infection. Hepatitis A can cause jaundice, diarrhea, fever, and weakness that can be severe.

Who should get the hepatitis A vaccine:
  • Anyone who wants protection against hepatitis A virus infection
  • People with chronic liver disease or blood clotting disorder.
  • People who use drugs
  • Men who have sex with men
  • People who are homeless
  • People who travel outside of the United States to areas where hepatitis A is common*
  • People who work with hepatitis A virus in a laboratory
  • People who have close contact with an international adoptee from an area where hepatitis A is common*

*Go to https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/diseases for a list of countries where hepatitis A is common.
Go to https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/hep-a.pdf for information about hepatitis A disease and hepatitis A vaccine.
Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B vaccine helps prevent hepatitis B virus infection. Hepatitis B virus infection can cause liver disease and liver cancer.

Who should get the hepatitis B vaccine:
  • Anyone who wants protection against hepatitis B virus infection
  • People who are at risk by blood or mucus exposure (for example, health care workers and people who use injection drugs)
  • People who are at risk by sexual contact (for example, sexually active persons who are not in monogamous relationships)
  • Men who have sex with men
  • People living with someone who has active hepatitis B infection
  • People with end-stage kidney disease (or on dialysis), diabetes, chronic liver disease (such as alcoholic liver disease or cirrhosis) or hepatitis C infection, or HIV infection
  • Staff and clients in sexually transmitted disease, HIV, drug abuse, hemodialysis, developmental disabilities, or correctional facilities
  • People who travel outside of the United States to areas where hepatitis B is common*

*Go to https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/diseases for a list of countries where hepatitis B is common.
Go to https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/hep-b.pdf for information about hepatitis B disease and hepatitis B vaccine.
Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)

Hib (Haemophilus influenzae type b) vaccine helps prevent a serious infection of the throat, lungs and covering of the brain.

Who should get the Hib vaccine:
  • People with a missing or damaged spleen or sickle cell disease
  • People who received hematopoietic stem cell transplant (such as a bone marrow transplant)

Go to https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/hib.pdf for information about Haemophilus influenzae type b and Hib vaccine.
HPV - Human Papillomavirus

Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine helps prevent infections that lead to cancers of the cervix, penis, and anus. Some HPV infections cause genital warts.

Who should get the HPV vaccine:
  • Females through age 26 years and males through age 21 years who have not completed HPV vaccination series.
  • Males 22-26 years of age who have a weakened immune system or HIV infection
  • Men who have sex with men and transgender persons through age 26 years

Go to https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/hpv.pdf for information about HPV and HPV vaccine.
Seasonal Flu (Influenza)

Adults should get the flu vaccine every year to help prevent getting influenza and spreading it to other people. Influenza is a respiratory infection that can result in serious illnesses and complications.

Who should get the flu vaccine:
  • People 6 months of age or older
  • People with a weakened immune system or chronic medical conditions who are at high risk for complications from influenza infection
  • People who have close contact with people who are at high risk for complications from influenza infection
  • Pregnant women to protect the mom and her baby
  • Health care workers to help protect them and to prevent spread of the flu
  • People with egg allergy should also get a flu vaccine (consult your health care professional)


Who should not get the flu vaccine:
  • People who have had a severe reaction to a flu vaccine

Go to https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/flulive.pdf and https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/flu.pdf for information about influenza and flu vaccine.
Meningococcal

Meningococcal vaccines help prevent serious and even life-threatening infections of the blood or covering of the brain.

There are two types of meningococcal vaccine- MenACWY and MenB. People should talk with their health care professional to determine which vaccine(s) they need and when to get them.
Who should get both MenACWY and MenB vaccines:
  • People with a missing or damaged spleen, sickle cell disease, or complement deficiencies
  • People who work with meningococcal bacteria in the laboratory
Who should get the MenACWY vaccine:
    • People with HIV infection
    • Military recruits
    • First-year college students who live in residential housing if they did not receive MenACWY at age 16 years or older
    • People who travel to countries where meningococcal disease is common*
    Who may get the MenB vaccine series:
    • Healthy young adults 16 through 23 years of age who want protection

    *Go to https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/diseases for a list of countries where meningococcal disease is common.
    Go to https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/mening.pdf for information about meningococcal disease and meningococcal vaccines.
MMR - Measles-mumps-rubella

The MMR vaccine helps prevent measles, mumps and rubella. These diseases can cause serious illness, complications, or death. People born in the U.S. before 1957 are considered to be immune.

Who should get the MMR vaccine (if no evidence of immunity):
  • People born in 1957 or later
  • Women who are not pregnant, but could become pregnant; rubella could cause miscarriage or serious birth defects
  • International travelers, close contacts of people with weakened immune systems, and college students
  • Health care workers
Who should not get the MMR vaccine
  • Pregnant women
  • People with a weakened immune system
  • People with HIV infection and a CD4 count under 200

Go to https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/mmr.pdf for information about measles, mumps, and rubella and MMR vaccine.
Pneumococcal

Pneumococcal vaccines help prevent serious and even life-threatening infections of the lungs, blood, or covering of the brain.
Adults need two types of pneumococcal vaccine—PCV13 and PPSV23. They should talk with their health care professional to determine when to get these vaccines.

Who should get the pneumococcal vaccine:
  • People 65 years of age or older
  • People with a chronic condition such as heart, lung (including asthma), liver, or kidney disease, or diabetes
  • People with cancer or weakened immune system, including HIV infection
  • People with missing or damaged spleen or sickle cell disease
  • People with cerebrospinal fluid leak or cochlear implant
  • People with chronic alcoholism or who smoke cigarettes

Go to https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/pcv13.pdf and https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/ppv.pdf for information about pneumococcal disease and pneumococcal vaccines.
Tdap - Tetanus, Diphtheria, and Pertussis (Tdap)

Tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis vaccine (Tdap) helps protect against tetanus (lockjaw), diphtheria (a severe infection of the nose, throat, or airway), and pertussis (whooping cough). People need 1 dose of Tdap in a lifetime except for pregnant women (see below).

Who should get the Tdap vaccine:
  • People who previously did not receive a dose of Tdap (Tdap is routinely given at age 11-12 years).
  • People who did not receive primary vaccination series for tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis.
  • People who have completed their childhood tetanus-diphtheria-pertussis vaccination series that did not include a dose of Tdap (Tdap is routinely given at age 11-12 years)
  • Pregnant women (a dose of Tdap should be given during each pregnancy)
  • People who have close contact with infants younger than 12 months
  • Health care workers

Go to https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/td-tdap.pdf for information about tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis and Td and Tdap vaccines.
Td - Tetanus and diphtheria

Tetanus and diphtheria vaccine (Td) protects against tetanus (lockjaw) and diphtheria (a severe infection of the nose, throat, or airway).

Who should get the Td vaccine:
  • People need a Td vaccine booster every 10 years
  • See related recommendations for tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis vaccine (Tdap)
Zoster (Shingles)

Shingles (zoster) vaccine helps prevent shingles and the severe pain that may remain after the rash goes away. Shingles can lead to complications involving the eye, pneumonia, inflammation of the brain, and other conditions.

Two shingles vaccines are available—the new recombinant zoster vaccine (RZV) and zoster vaccine live (ZVL).
Who should get the shingles vaccine (RZV or ZVL):
  • Adults 50–59 years should get RZV
  • Adults age 60 years or older can get either RZV or ZVL, but RZV is preferred
  • Adults who already receives ZVL should get RZV
Who should not get LZV:
  • Pregnant women
  • People with a weakened immune system
  • People with HIV infection and CD4 count under 200

Go to https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/shingles.pdf for information about shingles and shingles vaccines.

For more information:

To access the recommended adult immunization schedule and a table listing main contraindications, go to https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/hcp/adult.html

Vaccine Information Statements (VISs) for each of the vaccines are available at https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/index.html.

Information on travel vaccine requirements and recommendations (hepatitis A and B, meningococcal, and other vaccines) are available at https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/destinations/list/.

The latest versions of individual vaccine recommendations can be found at https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/acip-recs/index.html.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
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