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Work-Related Asthma: State-Based Surveillance

Work-related asthma: Most frequently reported agents associated with work-related asthma cases by asthma classification, 1993–2006
Table showing Work-related asthma: Most frequently reported agents associated with work-related asthma cases by asthma classification, 1993–2006

- indicates no cases ascertained.n.o.s. - not otherwise specified
1 Association of Occupational and Environmental Clinics (AOEC) exposure categories, exposure codes, and agents as of January, 2010. See AOEC exposure code lookup for more information.
2 Substances designated as asthma causing agents by the AOEC as of January 2010.
3 MW - molecular weight, L - low molecular weight (less than 10,000 Daltons), H - high molecular weight (greater than or equal to 10,000 Daltons), U - unable to classify molecular weight, and N/A - not applicable. High and low molecular weight designations presented are not meant to serve as a definitive source of molecular weights for reported agents.
4 “All others within this exposure category” includes exposures associated with less than 10 cases.
5 “All other exposure categories” includes overall categories with less than 10 cases reported. This includes glycols (n=9), organic sulfur compounds (n=9), aliphatic carboxylic acids (n=8), cyanides and nitriles (n=7), ethers (n=7), halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (n=6), aromatic nitro and amino compounds (n=2), organochlorine insecticides (n=1),and unknown hazard with brand name (n=1).

Note:  Each case may be associated with up to three putative agents. Percentages for each state are based on the number of cases reported from California (n=3,529), Massachusetts (n=710), Michigan (n=2,106), and New Jersey (n=417). See Appendix for information about data source and methods.

Source:  Provisional sentinel surveillance data as of December 2009, reported by R. Harrison and J. Flattery (California); L. Davis, E. Pechter, and K. Fitzsimmons (Massachusetts); K. Rosenman, MJ. Reilly, and D. Kalinowski (Michigan); and D. Schill and M. Pearson (New Jersey).

Reference Number: 2012T09-05A

Date Posted: December 2012

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